Towards mastering terahertz waves ?

Towards mastering terahertz waves ?

The terahertz waves span frequency ranges between the infrared spectrum (used, for example, for night vision) and gigahertz waves (which find their application, among other, in Wi-Fi connections). Terahertz waves allow for the detection of materials that are undetectable at other frequencies. However, the use of these waves is severely limited by the absence of…

Optical switching of antiferromagnetism

Optical switching of antiferromagnetism

      by Sebastian Manz and Manfred Fiebig, ETH Zürich based on an article published in Nature Photonics Antiferromagnetism is magnetic order, yet without a macroscopic magnetization as in iron. The absence of the field has interesting technological potential, but it also makes the antiferromagnetic state harder to control and set in a certain direction.…

Metal with chains

Metal with chains

by Tomáš Bzdušek, Department of Physics, ETH Zürich based on an article published in Nature The microscopic distinction between ordinary insulators and metals is understood since the early years of quantum mechanics by the so-called band theory. Semimetals form a natural boundary between the two, and they attracted much attention in recent years due to their unusual…

Three years after begin of the civil construction, the SwissFEL enters its commissioning phase!

Three years after begin of the civil construction, the SwissFEL enters its commissioning phase!

by Luc Patthey, PSI (Paul Scherrer Institut) The new Swiss Free Electron Laser facility SwissFEL is a unique light source which will provide new opportunities for cutting-edge research, and aims at providing solutions to important scientific and technological challenges facing modern society in the fields of Matter and Materials, Energy and the Environment, and Human Health.  SwissFEL…

Marta Gibert receives the Swiss Physical Society (SPS) prize

Marta Gibert receives the Swiss Physical Society (SPS) prize

Marta Gibert receives the Swiss Physical Society (SPS) Prize sponsored by IBM for her research on magnetic coupling at oxide interfaces, particularly in the interface engineering of heterostructures combining nickelates and manganites. The results led to the publications: “Exchange bias in LaNiO3–LaMnO3 superlattices“, M. Gibert, et al., Nature Materials 11, 195 (2012). “Interfacial Control of Magnetic Properties…

Selectively conductive or insulating

Selectively conductive or insulating

Some materials hold surprising — and possibly useful — properties: Neodymium nickel oxide is either a metal or an insulator, depending on temperature. This characteristic makes the material a potential candidate for transistors in modern electronic devices. To understand how neodymium nickel oxide makes the transition from metal to insulator and vice versa, researchers at…

Observation of Fermi arcs in the type-II Weyl semimetal MoTe2

Observation of Fermi arcs in the type-II Weyl semimetal MoTe2

Crystalline solids have particlelike, low-energy excitations — so-called quasiparticles — that describe collective states of many electrons interacting with the atomic nuclei. In 2015, scientists predicted the existence of an exotic new quasiparticle, dubbed a type-II Weyl fermion, that breaks the Lorentz invariance of special relativity and has no direct analog in the standard model…

Superconductivity: after the scenario, the staging

Superconductivity: after the scenario, the staging

Superconductivity with a high critical temperature (high Tc) continues to present a theoretical mystery. While this phenomenon is experimentally well established, no scientist has managed to explain its mechanism. In the late 90’s, the British physicist Anthony Leggett proposed a scenario based on the Coulomb energy. Today, researchers at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland,…

A positive step towards negative capacitance – towards more energy-efficient transistors

A positive step towards negative capacitance – towards more energy-efficient transistors

An international collaboration involving researchers from the University of Geneva, and colleagues from England, Spain, France and Luxembourg has demonstrated that destabilising the spontaneous polarisation of a special class of materials known as ferroelectrics gives rise to the phenomenon of negative capacitance that could one day lead to transistors with reduced power consumption. This research…

Switzerland winds up superconductivity

Switzerland winds up superconductivity

The unusual electronic properties of some superconducting materials permit lossless and dense electrical currents at very low temperatures, even in high magnetic fields. Conductors made of these materials are thus ideal for winding coils to generate very high magnetic fields, which are essential for a number of applications like magnetic medical imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy…

Towards fundamentals of oxide electronics: Polaronic nature of the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface

Towards fundamentals of oxide electronics: Polaronic nature of the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface

by Vladimir N. Strocov, Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institute Claudia Cancellieri, Materials Theory, EMPA / ETH Zurich Ulrich Aschauer, Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Bern based on an article published in Nature Communications Press release Computers and other electronic devices account for a substantial portion of worldwide energy use. With today’s technologies, it is not possible to…

Generation of « tailored » magnetic materials

Generation of « tailored » magnetic materials

Interlayer coupling through a dimensionality-induced magnetic state by Marta Gibert and Jean-Marc Triscone Department of Quantum Matter Physics, UNIGE Contact:  Prof. Jean-Marc Triscone (Tél. +41 22 379 62 18) based on an article published in Nature Communication Press release French/English   Every day, new technologies require more precision in the intrinsic properties of the materials used. To meet…

Graphene is both transparent and opaque to radiation

Graphene is both transparent and opaque to radiation

A microchip that filters out unwanted radiation with the help of graphene has been developed by scientists from the EPFL and tested by researchers of the University of Geneva (UNIGE). The invention could be used in future devices to transmit wireless data ten times faster.  EPFL and UNIGE scientists, have developed a microchip using graphene…

Superconductivity seen in a new light

Superconductivity seen in a new light

Superconducting materials have the characteristic of letting an electric current flow without resistance. The study of superconductors with a high critical temperature discovered in the 1980s remains a very attractive research subject for physicists. Indeed, many experimental observations still lack an adequate theoretical description. Researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) in Switzerland and the…

Connecting strongly correlated superfluids by a quantum point contact

Connecting strongly correlated superfluids by a quantum point contact

by Thierry Giamarchi, Department of Quantum Matter Physics, UNIGE Jean-Philippe Brantut, Institute for Quantum Electronics, Quantum optics group, ETH Zürich Tilman Esslinger, Institute for Quantum Electronics, Quantum optics group, ETH Zürich based on an article published in Science Work of physicists at the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich (ETHZ), in which they connected two materials with…

Fingerprints of Pseudogap and Charge ordering : A photoemission spectroscopy investigation

Fingerprints of Pseudogap and Charge ordering : A photoemission spectroscopy investigation

   By Christian E. Matt Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institute & Laboratory for Solid State Physics, ETHZ Claudia G. Fatuzzo, Institute for Condensed Matter Physics, EPFL Johan Chang, Physik-Institut, Universität Zürich based on an article published in Physical Review B For the past 30 years, high-temperature superconductivity presents itself as one of the most…

A new spin on graphene

A new spin on graphene

by Alberto Morpurgo, Department of Quantum Matter Physics, UNIGE based on an article published in Nature Communication Topological insulators are a new class of materials that are insulating in the bulk but have conducting boundaries (surfaces or edges). Their discovery has been made by analyzing theoretically the influence of spin-orbit interaction on the properties of graphene –…

Ultrafast control of magnetism across interfaces

Ultrafast control of magnetism across interfaces

The Geneva team of Prof. Jean-Marc Triscone is well known for the high quality oxide materials that they can synthesize in thin film form with nanoscale control. Of great interest is the family of so-called nickelates. These materials are metallic at high temperature but become insulating and magnetic at low temperature – they display a…

Not so superficial: intriguing physics atop strontium titanate

Not so superficial: intriguing physics atop strontium titanate

Summary Over the past decade, interfaces between oxide materials have been intensely studied, due to the powerful and often unexpected properties they can exhibit. New research using angle-resolved photoemission is revealing that another kind of “interface” – an oxide material’s surface – can be just as fascinating. Investigating a recently discovered surface state on SrTiO3,…

Photonic crystals cause active color change in chameleons

Photonic crystals cause active color change in chameleons

  Summary It is known for a long time that chameleons darken their skin through a process of melanin migration from the deep to the top layers of the dermis. When adult males are confronting a rival or a female, they rapidly switch between bright colors, changing from green to yellow, for example. It was…

Converting heat into electrical energy: a giant leap for oxides

Converting heat into electrical energy: a giant leap for oxides

An Italian-Swiss study just published in ‘Nature Communications’ reveals how some artificial materials composed of different oxides are able to convert heat into electricity with unprecedented efficiency. This work uncovered by researchers from the Universities of Genoa and Geneva, in collaboration with the Italian National Centre for Research (Cnr) opens the door to the use…

The European roadmap for graphene

The European roadmap for graphene

The Graphene Flagship, with a budget of €1 billion over a period of ten years, lays out a science and technology roadmap targeting research areas designed to take graphene and related 2d materials from academic laboratories into society. It comprises the activities of 142 academic and industrial partners in 23 countries, amongst which there are…

Graphene multiplies the power of light

Graphene multiplies the power of light

Could graphene turn light to electricity? Scientists have shown that graphene can convert a single photon into multiple electrons, showing much promise for future photovoltaic devices. Graphene is a material that has gathered tremendous popularity in recent years, due to its extraordinary strength and light weight. It can be generated by literally peeling it off…

Electron spin could be the key to high-temperature superconductivity

Electron spin could be the key to high-temperature superconductivity

Cuprates are materials with great promise for achieving superconductivity at higher temperatures (-120oC). This could mean low-cost electricity without energy loss. Intense research has focused on understanding the physics of cuprates in the hope that we can develop room-temperature superconductors. EPFL scientists have now used a cutting-edge technique to uncover the way cuprates become superconductors.…

A quantum channel made of light

A quantum channel made of light

In experiments using ultracold atoms and laser light, ETH researchers have measured a stepwise change in conductivity as the atoms pass through tiny structures. This is the first time that this quantum effect has been observed for electrically neutral particles. The results have been published in Nature. Two vessels filled with gas and connected by…

Multifunctional complex hydrides for tomorrow’s energy solutions

Multifunctional complex hydrides for tomorrow’s energy solutions

As an energy vector hydrogen is one of the main contenders to solve issues controlling the transition to a sustainable energy society, one of the prime challenges of the 21st century. An international team of researchers from the universities of Geneva, Aarhus and the Slovak Academy of Sciences, have recently introduced rational materials design to…

Sr2RuO4 reveals universal fermi-liquid scaling and quasiparticles beyond Landau theory

Sr2RuO4 reveals universal fermi-liquid scaling and quasiparticles beyond Landau theory

Summary Interacting many-body systems constitute one of the greatest challenges of physics. Attempts to understand the behavior of interacting fermions (such as electrons in a metal or the atoms of liquid 3He) led Landau to postulate a phenomenological model, which became known as Fermi-liquid theory. However since 60 years, the electrical properties of metals with…

Superconductivity switched on by magnetic field

Superconductivity switched on by magnetic field

Summary Superconductivity and magnetic fields are normally seen as rivals – very strong magnetic fields normally destroy the superconducting state. Physicists at the Paul Scherrer Institute have now demonstrated that a novel superconducting state is only created in the material CeCoIn5 when there are strong external magnetic fields. This state can then be manipulated by…

A thermoelectric materials emulator  (Science Magazine)

A thermoelectric materials emulator (Science Magazine)

Converting heat directly into power represents a potential major source of renewable energy. An international group of physicists recently accomplished an experiment with cold atoms trapped by lasers at ETHZ which simulates this physical phenomenon. Experimental measurements were compared to theoretical predictions made at the University of Geneva, École Polytechnique and Collège de France in…

Electrons with a “split personality”  (Nature Communications)

Electrons with a “split personality” (Nature Communications)

Researchers from the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) have been investigating interactions of the electrons responsible for conducting electricity in the high-temperature superconductor La1.77Sr0.23CuO4 above the transition temperature. These experiments at the PSI revealed that electrons have a “split personality“ meaning that they can have two different behaviours in the same material. This discovery is a…

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